The Treble

The Treble @ C'est What, 67 Front St. E., Toronto

The Treble

Oliver Pigott

Sat, April 5, 2014

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:30 pm

C'est What?

Toronto, ON

$8.00 - $10.00

The Treble
The Treble
When your band hails from Winnipeg, Manitoba, the hard-bitten Canadian prairie town that has produced some of the most iconic, legendary and important artists to ever come from The Great White North, you have some pretty big musical shoes to fill.

But with the same drive, musical chops and nose-to-the-grindstone work ethic as the likes of Neil Young, The Guess Who and The Weakerthans comes The Treble – a band that is truly making music fans sit up and take notice.

Since 2010, The Treble has carved out a reputation for crafting impressively bold and unique folk-infused pop music that has enough of the integral rock vibe to appeal to a phenomenal cross-section of music lovers.

The last three years have been a true whirlwind for the band. The Treble made an instant impact on the local music scene, and garnering attention far and wide. They were signed to one of the most respected booking agencies in the world, and were given the instant opportunity to tour across Canada playing every venue imaginable, from intimate clubs to arenas and stadiums.

Vocalist/lyricist Mark Brusegard, keyboardist Colin McTavish, drummer Dana Jerlo, guitarist Graeme Woods and bassist Pat Hansen, met on the local Winnipeg music scene, and quickly realized they could make beautiful – and impactful - music together.

“When we put this together we were serious. We lined up a group of guys that all had the same focus and vision. It’s amazing when everyone’s personalities and priorities line up. We get along so well, and I think that comes across in the music,” said Woods.

Produced by Chris Burke-Gaffney (Chantal Kreviazuk, McMaster and James), the band's recently released second EP "Northern Lights" is now their main focus as they criss-cross the country, charming music lovers from coast to coast.

Brusegard said like the rest of the band, when he composes music, and particularly the lyrics, honesty and authenticity are paramount. “We’re not trying to solve the world’s problems. I have always prided myself on making honest music. I don’t like trying to write a song about something I don’t feel like writing about. I love people knowing that the voice of The Treble is always real, and that’s what I appreciate in any music I listen to. If I can hear that a singer really believes what he is singing, that matters more to me, often, than how good the song is,” he said.

Their first official single to radio, entitled ‘Boston’ is already making an impact, and catching on with both programmers and fans alike. The track is indicative of just how collaborative the five musicians are. No one gets too precious about their ideas, allowing for a free-flowing discussion that creates an openness which is rare amongst groups of creative people.

“It is one of our folkier songs, but still has a pretty good pop sensibility to it. The song is special to us because it really only came together in its final form after we all got together on it. We had been working with this song for a long time. It was virtually done but there was something that still didn’t seem right about it,” said Brusegard, who said that he took five cracks at the chorus before throwing up his hands.

“So we brought everyone together, and we actually decided to try it out live. So everybody started singing and we had sort of a five-part harmony thing and that brought the chorus and the whole song to life. We were able to finish the song really quickly and when we heard the final version it gave us all chills. I don’t think any of us thought ‘oh yeah this is going to be a big hit,’ but it’s certainly a song that we all just really love as a band. Boston really represents everything that’s special about The Treble.”

Brusegard said the song ‘Overrated’ is truly a cautionary tale about life in the fast-paced, technologically-dependent 21st Century.

“We all have something that we’ve always wanted, desperately. What if you get there and find out it’s not all it’s cracked up to be? The song is about how you should take a step back for a second and see how awesome everything is along the way. Then it doesn’t matter if whatever it is at the end of the process turns out to be amazing or not, you’ve enjoyed the journey and got something wonderful out of it,” he explained.

“And that is how we look at what we do as a band. A lot of our songs are really about the process of creating music and how we’re trying to take a crack at something – being a professional band creating our own music – that everybody says is impossible right now. But we see the process as being as important as the end goal, if not more so.”

“In addition to being committed to their music and to each other, the members of The Treble are also committed to using their time and talents to help worthy causes. 24 Gigs in 24 Hours is their pride and joy.

“It was originally inspired by UK recording artist Frank Turner” explains Pat. “It’s like a crazy little tour in one day. We play 24 times in one day at 24 different venues, and all the proceeds from those 24 shows go to charity. In 2011 we did it for The Red Cross, and last year it was for the Winnipeg Harvest Food Bank. This year we are planning 24 shows in 24 hours in Toronto.

“It was originally inspired by UK recording artist Frank Turner” explains Pat. “It’s like a crazy little tour in one day. We play 24 times in one day at 24 different venues, and all the proceeds from those 24 shows go to charity. In 2011 we did it for The Red Cross, and last year it was for the Winnipeg Harvest Food Bank. This year we are planning 24 shows in 24 hours in Toronto.

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger, right?
Oliver Pigott
Oliver Pigott
Oliver is all at once a powerful singer, timeless songwriter and explosive performer.

His 6'2" stature and outrageously wild hair is only upstaged by his soulful and heartfelt music. His lyrics reflect a streetwise and well traveled soul, and his observations of joy, pain, benevolence, cruelty and social injustice are underscored by an equally intense melding of blues, Americana and rock'n'roll.

Oliver first discovered his passion for music at the age of twelve, soon after the passing of his father, a legendary blues harmonica player. He began playing harmonica himself, jamming to his father's vinyl and emulating the styles of Muddy Waters and Elmore James.

As a teenager Oliver taught himself guitar and while living in Portugal he began performing in bars along the Algarve. He moved to Toronto and gathered a passionate legion of fans with his band 'Laughing Sam's Dice', playing such legendary clubs as the El Mocambo and The Opera House. At 21 he signed a publishing deal with BMG.

Now, a few short years later and armed with some fifty-plus songs, Oliver performs regularly in Southern California to ever-growing numbers of music lovers that yearn for honest and meaningful music.
Venue Information:
C'est What?
67 Front Street E.
Toronto, ON, M5E 1B5
http://www.cestwhat.ca